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20110707
20110707
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and the taliban in pakistan and afghanistan. osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it is too early to tell for certain initial evidence suggests we halted the momentum of the taliban insurgency in its heartland. mr. speaker, we are entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighting and patrolling and our forces training and mentoring. as president obama said last month the mission is changing from, that to support. when we arrived there was no one to hand over to. no proper army or police. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. there have been well known problems especially with the afghan police but there has been real progress in the last two ye
led political entitlement. the death of bin laden presents the taliban with a moment of choice. al qaeda are weakened. their leader is dead. last month the u n adopted two separate sanctions regimes creating a clear distinction to separate taliban from al qaeda. local peace councils havbeen established in almost all afghanistan's provinces allow 1800 people from 17 provinces to be enrolled for reintegration. we should take this opportunity to send a clear message to the taliban that now is the time to break al qaeda and participate in a peaceful political process. in this task we need pakistan's assistance. as i discussed last week as much in pakistan's interest as britain or afghanistan. the taliban pose a more wolf read to the states of pakistan as well. mr. speaker there is no reason afghanistan should be destined to remain a broken country. it has fertile agricultural land and stands at the crossroads of asia's training program. it has succeeded in the past when not wracked by conflict. afghanistan has many challenges ahead. there are security issues and lack of government capa
, taliban and others got strength and found terrorist center and now we're involved in a war that involves the future of the world, not just peace for the world, but american peace as well. indeed, i would be very caution as we go about -- cautious as we go about suggesting that we automatically walk away from the commander in chief's plan. indeed if we are not careful, the vacuum will catch up with us and america will find itself in a much broader and a much more intense struggle. with that i yield back the balance of my time. >> would the gentleman yield? the chair: the gentleman yields back? for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee rise? >> i move to strike the last word. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. cohen: thank you. before i yield to my colleague from california to respond, i would like to mention, i appreciated mr. lewis' history, but i would suggest to you that al qaeda could have found a base in yemen, they could have found a base in the sudan, they could have found a base in other places. there was nothing particularly unique about afghani
. in this case, the mission was to take the taliban out of power in afghanistan, to destroy al qaeda training camps, and to find those responsible for 9/11. the nation-building mission turned out to be very problematic. we need to pull the plug on that experiment and redeploy our forces and redeploy our resources. tavis: this is the all hell will break out if we pull out completely. what is your response? >> let me explain a little bit further. there are those who talk about staying to build an effective police. but literacy is very low. the police numbers are completely added. there is an enormous amount of carson. the police in afghanistan are fugs. we eatow they are -- we them and train them and now we have a trained and equipped thugs. you think via administration has decided we still need to be there? >> the administration uses some of the language in saying that we need to change your direction. he is doing so in a very slow pace that keeps us in this nation-building capacity. i think it is very hard to reverse course. that has proven itself time overtime as our nation becomes involved
that weapons coming out of iran to help the taliban at a crucial moment in afghanistan. >> as the president hurries to bring 3 #,00 33,000 troops homen the next year in iraq, the white house is indicating they'd like to leave 10,000 troops, despite the agreement that calls for all forces to leave by the end of the year. so far, the prime minister has not made any request. he was busy meeting the iranians. at the pentagon, jennifer griffin, fox news. >> bret: nato secretary-general says time is running out for libyan leader quad quad quad. thequad -- libyan leader muammar gaddafi. they have destroyed hundreds of military targets since the campaign began in march. libyan prosecutors say they will charge the rebel leaders with the national security crimes. hundreds of rebels launched massive offensive in the mountains of southwest tripoli today. taking the america out of captain america. that is later in the grapevine. but first, the plight of the under >> bret: minnesota governor mark dayton met with lawmakers again today as the government shutdown continues there. no progress has been report
.s. officials say they killed 120 insurgents and top leaders, many taliban, but several of them arabs linked to al qaeda, damaging their network. they're said to be mostly across the border, and pakistan is again a concern back where they started. we pushed down into the valley, still an insurgent stronghold, high-tech american attack helicopters buzzed overhead until militants shot at them. >> it's uncharacteristic for the taliban. they're getting gutsy. right past there are usually patrols. if you push it far past that, you're going to take enemy contact it's pretty certain. >> the afghans clear about who lay in wait for them ahead. [ speaking foreign language ] >> reporter: at the foot of the valley, the american base is often hit by pot shots, times from lone gunmen up high, who they then mortar. al qaeda's return to these remote hills could tie america's hands, making it harder to justify pulling back from here. the terrorist network made america's case for invading, slipping back in just when america makes its case to leave. nick paton walsh. >>> we're going to find out what's next for
. the threat is not from the taliban, but apparently from their own government . >> he held me like this. >> it happened in seconds. >> where did they hit you. >> punches to the gut from four attacks. a few baton whacks and the kicks to the body. >> i was thinking about -- that i'm going to die today. >> the victim of the attack was the pakistani journalist. his attackers were not street thugs they had police uniforms on and pulled him over. >> they said if you want to be a hero, we will make you a hero. >> and an example. >> it's not clear who roughed him up, but he is feeting over a string of attacks against journalists that raised a troubling question. are the spy agents? they told the british paper, the guardian he was kidnapped and beaten after he wrote a report about illegal arrests by intelligence agencies, whoever beat him a second time didn't like that they made him look bad. >> the last time, they threatened to wrap my body. under these circumstances, what can i do? >> his beating came less than three weeks after the still unsolved murder of another pakistani journalist. for ye
democracy. with the american acquiescence and saudi financeing, the pakistani government created the taliban as islamabad's van guard for the conquest of afghanistan. in the process they set in place a fundamentalist antiwestern radical terrorist state. let's note that even after 9/11, after 3,000 of our citizens had been slaughtered, the i.s.i. continued to covertly support radical islamic terrorists and they are still engaged in such hostile acts, even as american lives are being lost even today. in 2010 the london school of economics published a report that found agents of the i.s.i., this is 2010, long after 9/11, were, quote, funding and training the afghan taliban, end of quote. and the top things are -- to top this off, there is substantial reporting that has been done that suggests that pakistani diplomats are lobbying the afghanistan government -- afghan government leaders suggesting that they dump the united states and turn to china for a partnership and re-- in reconstruction. this isn't shame on them, this is shame on us. washington may be able to coerce and bribe islamabad into
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)